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This upcoming season of the Cornell Cinema is the first curated by Molly Catherine Ryan, Cornell Cinema’s new director. She’s been on the job since last September and here she talks about her background, what sparked her love of movies and thoughts on a few upcoming series. 

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Tuesday, January 31st, Cinemapolis will begin offering “Masked Tuesdays.” The theater will start offering a day when all staff and moviegoers will wear masks. This is an effort to make moviegoing accessible for people who feel safest and most comfortable in a fully masked environment. 

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In the 80’s and 90’s – CU Cinema screened “Animation Celebration” and “Spike and Mike”, among others - that showcased short works in all manner of mediums from around the world. The short length meant that you’d see CGI, hand-drawn pieces and stop-motion, all in one tight package.

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“Living” is an exceptional film on several levels. The screenwriter, Kazuo Ishiguro, a Nobel Laureate, provides us a story created with a transfer to London from the Japanese setting of Ikuru, directed by Aikira Kurasawa, the highly regarded director of The Seven Sumarai (and several other m…

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Kate Donohue is the new executive director for Cinemapolis, the position previously held by Brett Bossard, who recently moved to a new job at his alma mater, Ithaca College. Donohue moved to Ithaca with her family in 2016, and her background is in writing, teaching and non-profit organizatio…

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I can’t remember ever feeling as culpable and guilty as I did in the wake of Maria Schrader’s “She Said” (Universal-Annapurna Pictures-Plan B Entertainment, 2022, 129 min.), which tells the story of the two New York Times reporters, Megan Twohey (Carey Mulligan) and Jodi Kantor (Zoe Kazan), …

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In the Fableman’s, Steven Spielberg presents a moving largely autobiographical  mosaic of family life. Though there were a few somewhat strange scenes throughout the film, he & his outstanding cast engage us with a range of elements - good, as well as problematic - which contributed to t…

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I’ve been studying film for enough years that I judge documentaries like Elvis Mitchell’s “Is That Black Enough For You?” (Netflix, 2022, 135 min.) by what they can tell me or show me that I didn’t know before. 

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Writer-director-producer Todd Field’s “Tár”  is an extraordinary piece that for more than half of its running time seems to have no story at all, and it plays out far from the Hollywood narrative machine, where nothing happens that isn’t plot. Even though a story emerges that leads to a conc…

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This week, I was conflicted, wanting to review Olivia Wilde’s controversial new film “Don’t Worry Darling” (Warner Bros. Pictures—New Line Cinema—Vertigo Entertainment, 2022, 123 min.) while also wanting this month’s four columns to be themed around Halloween and spooky cinema. 

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October has been Silent Movie Month in  Ithaca since 2012. This year, The Finger Lakes Film Trail, Wharton Studio Museum and Historic Ithaca, are together presenting a series of events called  “Lit. Women of Silent Film.”

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The first images we see in Sierra Pettengill’s new documentary “Riotsville, USA” (Magnolia—Field of Vision—Canal & the Gallery, Arch + Bow Films—XRM Media—LinLay Productions, 2022, 91 min.) are grainy 16 mm shots of an anonymous small American town. Looks like a nice place. A sign in the…

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It won’t offend me one bit if you skip my review of writer-director Zach Cregger’s “Barbarian” (20th Century Studio—Regency Enterprises—New Regency—Almost Never Films—Hammerstone Studios—Vertical Entertainment—-Boulderlight Pictures, 2022, 107 min.), as long as you see it. The best way to ex…

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I swear, I don’t know what happened. It’s like I checked my email for five minutes, and next thing I knew, there’s like 75 new movies in town. They’re all playing at odd times and odd hours, so for this week, I literally flipped a coin to decide what to watch. The results of the experiment a…

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How do you top “Mad Max: Fury Road,” quite possibly the greatest pure action-chase-female-empowerment epic ever made? (Seriously, name a better film.)  If you’re George Miller (“The Road Warrior”), you make a fairy tale, right down to the simplicity of that eternal opening line, “Once upon a…

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By the time you read this, Cornell Cinema will have already unspooled a ton of film, but then again, that’s what they do. If you come to town indifferent to film, you may become a fan. And if you love cinema, you still won’t have time to see every event on the calendar unless you give up thi…

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I cite this Roger Ebert quote all the time: “It’s not what a movie is about, but how it’s about it.” That’s certainly true of Domee Shi’s “Turning Red” (Walt Disney Pictures-Pixar Animation Studios. 2022, 100 min.) Set in Toronto in 2002, the movie’s all about this young girl named Mei who’s…

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The money people always worry whether characters are “likeable.” Most script re-writes come from an executive memo to “make the lead character more likeable.” I love the actor Aubrey Plaza because she doesn’t give a tin weasel whether her characters are likeable. Plaza knows Hitchcock’s Dict…

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David Leitch’s “Bullet Train” (Sony Pictures Releasing-Columbia Pictures-Fuqua Films-87North Productions, 2022, 126 min.) is aptly titled. An assassin, code-named “Ladybug”, played by Brad Pitt, boards the title transport to pull off a simple snatch-and-run assignment involving a particular …

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I’ve never seen a film like Phil Tippett’s “Mad God” (Shudder, 2021, 83 minutes) and I may never again. It’s the damnedest thing: you could show “Mad God” to 17 people, like the opening night screening at Cinemapolis I attended in July, ask each person what the film was about, and you might …

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When I went with Constant Companion to Cinemapolis’s opening night screening of Phil Tippett’s “Mad Dog”, we got quite a bonus: Corey Rosen, VP of Creative Marketing at Tippett Studios, happened to be in Ithaca with his family, looking at colleges with his son Henry. After the screening, Ros…